NEW Interview with Matt Roberts from Vanity Fair   Leave a comment

Here is a NEW Interview with Matt Roberts from Vanity Fair

From Vanity Fair:

As some Outlander lovers suspected it might, this week’s battle episode marked the end of Duncan Lacroix’s Murtagh Fitzgibbons’, a fan favorite who survived on the show long past the point when his character died in the books. (For perspective, author Diana Gabaldon’s version of the character perished in the Battle of Culloden, which would have been way back in Season 3.) Lacroix was the only original cast member left on the show outsides of co-leads Sam Heughan and Caitríona Balfe, so this final goodbye was a difficult one for both the Outlander character and the cast and crew.

More after the jump!

Murtagh’s end obviously hits Jamie hardest; after all, the head of the Fraser clan is already feeling guilty for fighting alongside the British in exchange for land. But according to Heughan, the loss of Murtagh carries an even more symbolic weight: “It’s like losing a part of his past—his connection to Scotland.”

Many book readers who loved having Jamie’s godfather and long-time companion on the show past his expiration date in the novel had hoped for a happier ending. Maybe Murtagh would slip into another book character’s role and marry Jamie’s aunt Jocasta (Maria Kennedy Doyle), for example. But this, showrunner Matt Roberts told Vanity Fair, was never going to happen.

“I don’t know if you’ve noticed this,” Roberts said, “but our fans love to speculate. They assumed Murtagh would just take over the Duncan Innes story. We can’t just do that. You can’t just take a character like Duncan Innes—with all his character traits—and turn him into a character we already know. We never even discussed that.” (He cautions theory-happy fans from making similar assumptions about Marsali taking over for a book character named Malva this season.) Roberts said the plan all along was to maneuver Murtagh into a position where he and Jamie would, tragically, wind up on opposite sides of the Battle of Alamance.

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